Brandon Stanton’s compelling photoblog: Humans of New York

Photographer Brandon Stanton is the brainchild behind the wildly popular blog Humans of New York, otherwise known as HONY.

Stanton spends his days photographing on the streets of New York City, and what truly sets his images apart from those found on other photography blogs is his personal interaction with his subjects.

Now more then a year into his blogging project, Stanton has collected compelling quotes and stories from an estimated 10,000 New Yorkers who he has stopped to photograph along the way. In the meantime, HONY’s follower base has grown to about one million fans.

Be sure to visit Stanton’s Humans of New York blog and, if you haven’t already done so, check out the video clip above for an insightful commentary into his creative inspiration!

Related post: Finding comfort in portraits of Bostonians

Finding comfort in portraits of Bostonians

Brandon Stanton Boston 9

“He was training to be a surgeon when we got married. One night he came home from two days straight on the job, and I’d cooked him dinner. Right before he fell asleep in his plate of food, he asked me what movie I’d like to watch. I thought it was so sweet.”

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The stunning wildlife portraits of Nick Brandt

Nick Brandt – On This Earth, A Shadow FallsAbrams Books/Big Life Editions, 2010. 192 pp., 90 illustrations

Nick Brandt is a Los Angeles based videogapher who has followed his passion for photographing the wild animals of East Africa for the past 14 years.

With his medium-format film camera in hand, Brandt spends weeks following and becoming accepted by his subjects, before waiting for favourable combinations of lighting and behaviour.

The resulting photographs are nothing short of spectacular.

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Nobody tells beginners this…

beginners| source |

This piece refers to the craft of writing, but of course applies equally to all creative endeavour, including photography.

As writer and social media passionista, Peg Fitzpatrick says:

It isn’t easy to take the leap and share your art. Every word, brushstroke or note is a leap of faith exposing your dreams which shows vulnerability. Be brave and act on your passion.

Which all equates to: Don’t give up! 🙂

Photographing love

Lovers1Sally Mann, “Ponder Heart” (2009)

In the late-winter afternoons for half a decade, I photographed my husband of forty-two years. With the weak sun coming through the studio windows, we were warmed by the woodstove and his two fingers of bourbon. I loved it, this work: the quietude; the muted burble of NPR; the exposures sometimes so long that he fell asleep. In this picture, a relatively short exposure, he was braced against the glass, holding still for the counted-out minutes. You see that slight movement at the tips of his fingers? That is the beating of his heart.

From the series “Proud Flesh,” exhibited at Gagosian Gallery/Courtesy Gagosian Gallery and Edwynn Houk Gallery.

Lovers2JoAnn Verburg, “First Day Back in Italy (Pisa)” (1998)

Why, after all these years, do I keep wanting to set up my tripod and camera when I’m with Jim?. It’s a puzzle. What impulse is it that he—and only he—brings out in me, that has lasted seemingly forever, and goes as deep as it does? It’s a miracle. At this moment, we’re on the road, driving west, squinting into the sun. My camera is in the back seat. I can’t wait to stop in one of these little motels and watch him fall asleep: watch his arms, legs, and torso give in to gravity, see his breathing become slower and even, and watch as his face loses all traces of expectations and judgment. It’s one of the great gifts I get when I look in the ground glass: a gift Jim gives me. I lose track of time and our two bodies no longer separate us. What he is, I am, and what I need dissolves into a single, concentrated act of seeing.

Courtesy of Pace/MacGill Gallery.

Lovers3Angelo Merendino, from “My Wife’s Fight with Breast Cancer”

In September, 2007, I married the girl of my dreams; five months later Jennifer was diagnosed with breast cancer. Throughout our battle, we were fortunate to have a strong support group, but still struggled to get people to understand the difficulties we faced daily. I began to photograph our everyday life, hoping to show the reality of living with this horrible disease. As time passed, trust grew, and at a certain point Jen stopped feeling like she had to pose, she was just Jen…happy, sad, silly, or whatever she was feeling at that moment. Now that Jen has passed, I look at these photographs and I feel our love.

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Instant nostalgia – why we love the look and feel of lo-fi images

Adelphi Hotel, Melbourneimage ⓒ SWS

I absolutely love the look and feel of lo-fi images. And given the popularity of smartphone photography apps and the photo sharing program Instagram, it’s obvious I’m not alone…

There’s a plethora of both free and affordable smartphone photo apps out there, so if you’re keen to give them a go, you’ll have plenty to choose from!

In fact, I suspect I just might be addicted to downloading photography apps! They’re lots of fun and certainly help to bring out your creative side, with a wide choice of funky filters to transform your straight images into an almost countless range of potential new looks.

Some of the apps I enjoy using include Camera+, PhotoStudio, Hipstamatic, Lo-Mob, PhotoToaster, and Instagram.

The above image is one of my recent iPhone shots – below are some more images which incorporate a range of different app effects

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