A new angle on oceanic imagery

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Australian photographer Ray Collins first picked up a camera in 2007 and used it to photograph his friends surfing around his coastal home after long shifts working in a nearby coalmine.

His attention quickly shifted from his friends to patterns and forms he noticed in the waves. Collins, who is colourblind, was also drawn to the interplay of light and water, perhaps more attuned to contrast than the nuance of color.

He poetically refers to this switch from coalminer to fine art photographer as a balance between his “black life and blue life”.

Here’s some more of Ray’s striking oceanic imagery for your viewing pleasure:

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Stefanie Schneider’s work with expired Polaroid film

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Stefanie Schneider lives and works in Los Angeles and Berlin.

Stefanie’s scintillating situations take place in the American West. Situated on the verge of an elusive super-reality, her photographic sequences provide the ambience for loosely woven story lines and a cast of phantasmic characters. She works with the largely uncontrollable chemical mutations of expired Polaroid film stock.

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Amazing (non-digital) dreamscapes by JeeYoung Lee

Resurrection

It’s amazing to witness an artist who embraces one of their greatest limitations, turning it instead into one of their greatest advantages.

For Korean artist JeeYoung Lee the question was how to utilise her small studio space in Seoul measuring  just 3.6m x 4.1m x 2.4m (11.8′ x 13.5′ x 7.8′). Instead of finding a new location or reverting to digital trickery, Lee challenged herself to build some of the most elaborate sets imaginable for the sake of making a single photograph.

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